Foundations and Trends® in Human–Computer Interaction > Vol 10 > Issue 2

Canine-Centered Computing

Larry Freil, School of Interactive Computing, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA, larry.freil@gatech.edu Ceara Byrne, School of Interactive Computing, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA, ceara.byrne@gmail.com Giancarlo Valentin, School of Interactive Computing, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA, giancarlo@gatech.edu Clint Zeagler, School of Interactive Computing, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA, clintzeagler@gmail.com David Roberts, Department of Computer Science, North Carolina State University, USA, robertsd@csc.ncsu.edu Thad Starner, School of Interactive Computing, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA, thad@cc.gatech.edu Melody Jackson, School of Interactive Computing, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA, melody@cc.gatech.edu
 
Suggested Citation
Larry Freil, Ceara Byrne, Giancarlo Valentin, Clint Zeagler, David Roberts, Thad Starner and Melody Jackson (2017), "Canine-Centered Computing", Foundations and Trends® in Human–Computer Interaction: Vol. 10: No. 2, pp 87-164. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/1100000064

Published: 04 Apr 2017
© 2017 L. Freil et al.
 
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In this article:
1. Introduction
2. History and Background
3. Psychophysics of Dogs
4. A Proposed Framework for Canine-Centered Computing
5. Survey of Canine–Centered Computing Studies
6. Training Methods
7. Evaluating Canine–Centered Interactions and Interfaces
8. Ethical Issues
9. Canine Design Principles
10. Call to Action
References

Abstract

Canines and humans have lived together for many thousands of years, to our mutual benefit. In addition to providing companionship, dogs can perform critical roles, such as assisting humans with medical concerns, searching for lost individuals, and detecting substances by scent. Researching how technology might be designed for canines has the potential to significantly improve the lives of both dogs and humans. We draw upon the extensive foundations and literature in human-centered computing to identify and adapt models and methods that are relevant for canines. Our work surveys the landscape of canine-centered computing and canine psychophysics, and generates a framework and set of guidelines to help inform the requirements, design, and evaluation of systems for canines. Our principal aim is to invite and challenge human computer interaction (HCI) researchers to contribute to the field of canine-centered computing, and we conclude with a call to action in this promising nascent field.

DOI:10.1561/1100000064
ISBN: 978-1-68083-244-0
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Table of contents:
1. Introduction
2. History and Background
3. Psychophysics of Dogs
4. A Proposed Framework for Canine-Centered Computing
5. Survey of Canine–Centered Computing Studies
6. Training Methods
7. Evaluating Canine–Centered Interactions and Interfaces
8. Ethical Issues
9. Canine Design Principles
10. Call to Action
References

Canine-Centered Computing

Canines and humans have lived together for many thousands of years, to our mutual benefit. In addition to providing companionship, dogs can perform critical roles, such as assisting humans with medical concerns, searching for lost individuals, and detecting substances by scent. Researching how technology might be designed for canines has the potential to significantly improve the lives of both dogs and humans.

Canine-Centered Computing examines the history and the current state of the art in the nascent field of Canine-centered Computing. It draws upon the extensive foundations and literature in human-centered computing to identify and adapt models and methods that are relevant for canines. It surveys the landscape of canine-centered computing and canine psychophysics, and generates a framework and set of guidelines to help inform the requirements, design, and evaluation of systems for canines.

Canine-Centered Computing provides a foundation that will enable an HCI researcher or practitioner who is familiar with HCI theory, models, and methods to understand and contribute to this promising nascent field.

 
HCI-064