Foundations and Trends® in Information Retrieval > Vol 7 > Issue 2–3

Information Retrieval for E-Discovery

Douglas W. Oard, College of Information Studies and UMIACS, University of Maryland, USA, oard@umd.edu William Webber, College of Information Studies, University of Maryland, USA, wew@umd.edu
 
Suggested Citation
Douglas W. Oard and William Webber (2013), "Information Retrieval for E-Discovery", Foundations and Trends® in Information Retrieval: Vol. 7: No. 2–3, pp 99-237. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/1500000025

Published: 26 Jun 2013
© 2013 D. W. Oard and W. Webber
 
Subjects
Search,  E-Government,  Databases on the web,  Information retrieval,  Classification and prediction,  User modelling and user studies for IR,  Usability, interactivity, and visualization issues in IR,  Text mining,  Performance issues for IR systems,  Natural language processing for IR,  Metasearch, rank aggregation and data fusion,  Information extraction,  Information categorization and clustering,  Indexing and retrieval of structured documents,  Evaluation issues and test collections for IR,  Distributed IR and federated search,  Cross-lingual and multilingual IR,  Applications of IR,  Specific user groups (children, elders, etc.),  Multimodal interaction,  Information visualization,  Design and Evaluation,  XML and Semi-Structured Data,  Storage, Access Methods, and Indexing,  Metadata Management,  Information theory and computer science,  Image and Video Retrieval
 

Free Preview:

Article Help

Share

Download article
In this article:
1 Introduction
2. The E-Discovery Process
3. Information Retrieval for E-Discovery
4. Evaluating E-Discovery
5. Experimental Evaluation
6. Looking to the Future
7. Conclusion
A. Interpreting Legal Citations
Acknowledgments
Notations and Acronyms
References

Abstract

E-discovery refers generally to the process by which one party (for example, the plaintiff) is entitled to "discover" evidence in the form of "electronically stored information" that is held by another party (for example, the defendant), and that is relevant to some matter that is the subject of civil litigation (that is, what is commonly called a "lawsuit"). This survey describes the emergence of the field, identifies the information retrieval issues that arise, reviews the work to date on this topic, and summarizes major open issues.

DOI:10.1561/1500000025
ISBN: 978-1-60198-678-8
144 pp. $99.00
Buy book
 
ISBN: 978-1-60198-679-5
144 pp. $230.00
Buy E-book
Table of contents:
1. Introduction
2. The E-Discovery Process
3. Information Retrieval for E-Discovery
4. Evaluating E-Discovery
5. Experimental Evaluation
6. Looking to the Future
7. Conclusion
A. Interpreting Legal Citations
Acknowledgments
Notations and Acronyms
References

Information Retrieval for E-Discovery

E-discovery refers generally to the process by which one party (for example, the plaintiff) is entitled to discover evidence in the form of electronically stored information that is held by another party (for example, the defendant), and that is relevant to some matter that is the subject of civil litigation (that is, what is commonly called a "lawsuit"). Information Retrieval for E-Discovery describes the emergence of the field, identifies the information retrieval issues that arise, reviews the work to date on this topic, and summarizes major open issues.

Information Retrieval for E-Discovery is an ideal primer for anyone with an interest in e-discovery; be it researchers who first practiced law but now study information retrieval, or those who studied information retrieval but now practice law.

 
INR-025