International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics > Vol 1 > Issue 1

Private Sector Participation in Natural Resource Management: What Relevance in Developing Countries?

Nick Johnstone, Head of Unit, Empirical Policy Analysis Unit, Environment Directorate, Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Joshua Bishop, Senior Adviser, Economics and the Environment, The World Conservation Union (IUCN),
 
Suggested Citation
Nick Johnstone and Joshua Bishop (2007), "Private Sector Participation in Natural Resource Management: What Relevance in Developing Countries?", International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics: Vol. 1: No. 1, pp 67-109. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/101.00000002

Published: 15 May 2007
© 2007 Nick Johnstone and Joshua Bishop
 
Subjects
Environmental Economics
 
Keywords
Q22Q23Q24Q25Q28Q56D23H54
FisheryForestryLandWaterRenewable Resources and Conservation – Government PolicyEnvironment and DevelopmentProperty RightsInfrastructure
 

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In this article:
1 Introduction
2 Theoretical Framework
3 Private Rights and Markets for Fisheries Resources
4 Private Rights and Markets for Irrigation Water
5 Private Rights and Markets for Potable Water
6 Private Rights and Markets for Forest Resources
7 Conclusions
References

Abstract

In this paper we are concerned with private sector participation in natural resource management in developing countries. The paper addresses both the establishment (or formalisation) of private property rights to natural resources, and the private markets in which such rights are exchanged. The paper examines a number of different natural resources: irrigation water, potable water, fisheries, and forest land. It is argued that private sector participation in natural resource management has the potential to secure significant environmental benefits, but that the optimal form which such participation takes is dependent upon the characteristics of the resource in question. Irrespective of the resource and the form of private sector participation adopted, regulatory capacity is key to securing public environmental benefits.

DOI:10.1561/101.00000002