Annals of Corporate Governance > Vol 1 > Issue 4

Corporate Governance and Human Resource Management

Geoffrey Wood, University of Essex, UK, geoffreywood65@hotmail.com Chris Brewster, University of Reading, UK,
 
Suggested Citation
Geoffrey Wood and Chris Brewster (2016), "Corporate Governance and Human Resource Management", Annals of Corporate Governance: Vol. 1: No. 4, pp 249-319. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/109.00000010

Published: 21 Nov 2016
© 2016 G. Wood and C. Brewster
 
Subjects
Management structure, governance and performance,  Corporate finance: Corporate governance,  Industrial Organization,  Comparative political economy,  Regulation
 
Keywords
G34 Corporate GovernanceJ53 Labor-Management RelationsM12 Personnel ManagementM54 Labor Management
Human resourcesHRMCorporate governanceEmployment practicesLabor relations
 

Free Preview:

Article Help

Share

Download article
In this article:
1. Different Traditions of Comparative Institutional Analysis: Owner and Worker Rights
2. Heterodox Socio-economic Alternatives
3. Varieties of Corporate Governance and HRM
4. Internal Systemic Diversity and HRM
5. Applied Evidence of National Diversity in HRM Practice
6. HRM Outcomes
7. New Financial Actors and HRM
8. Long Historical Legacies and National Institutional Orders
9. Economic Crisis and Natural Resources: The Case of Long Energy Transitions
10. MNEs and Pioneers of Change
11. Conclusion
References

Abstract

In seeking to compare the consequences of different corporate governance regimes around the world, an initial focus was on overall growth consequences. However, given that different types of national corporate governance regime appear to do better than others at specific times, and the great variations in national development within the main broad national corporate governance families, there has been a growing interest in the specific effects on the firm itself [Morgan et al., 2010], rather than seeing it as a transmission belt between relative owner and stakeholder rights on the one hand, and macro-economic outcomes on the other hand [La Porta et al., 1997, 1999, 2000]. At the simplest, such analysis has sought to interpose relative worker rights and social protection under the law as a variable that might dilute owner rights, diverting firms from a shareholder value maximisation agenda [Botero et al., 2004]. However, this goes little beyond simple hierarchical models that suggest that a single institutional feature underwriting property rights can explain everything of significance that goes on in the firm. So a growing body of applied work looks at the consequences of dominant corporate governance regimes for a key stakeholder grouping that has sunk human capital within the firm. Indeed, arguments are made for a re-evaluation of types of institutional arrangement and associated patterns of firm finance in relation to what might best explain particular sets of HRM and employment practices, and the direct effect on organisational performance, alongside how this might affect overall economic growth [Goergen et al., 2012, Gospel and Pendleton, 2003, Black et al., 2008, Pendleton, 2005]. There are many different dimensions to national corporate governance regimes, encompassing the legal, the political, the economic, and, indeed, embedded patterns of social behaviour; there is much debate within the literature as to which is the most important aspect of each.

DOI:10.1561/109.00000010
ISBN: 978-1-68083-188-7
85 pp. $65.00
Buy book
 
ISBN: 978-1-68083-189-4
85 pp. $130.00
Buy E-book
Table of contents:
1. Different Traditions of Comparative Institutional Analysis: Owner and Worker Rights
2. Heterodox Socio-economic Alternatives
3. Varieties of Corporate Governance and HRM
4. Internal Systemic Diversity and HRM
5. Applied Evidence of National Diversity in HRM Practice
6. HRM Outcomes
7. New Financial Actors and HRM
8. Long Historical Legacies and National Institutional Orders
9. Economic Crisis and Natural Resources: The Case of Long Energy Transitions
10. MNEs and Pioneers of Change
11. Conclusion
References

Corporate Governance and Human Resource Management

The initial focus when comparing different corporate governance regimes around the world was on overall growth consequences. But as different types of national corporate governance regimes do better than others at specific times, and with great variance in national development within the main national corporate governance families, there is a growing interest in the specific effects on the firm itself. These analyses have interposed relative worker rights and social protection under the law as a variable that might dilute owner rights, diverting firms from a shareholder value maximisation agenda. However, this does not advance beyond simple hierarchical models suggesting that a single institutional feature underwriting property rights can explain everything of significance that goes on in the firm. As a result, there is growing body of applied research examining the consequences of dominant corporate governance regimes for a key stakeholder grouping with sunk human capital within the firm. Furthermore, arguments are made for a re-evaluation of the types of institutional arrangement and associated patterns of firm finance in relation to what might best explain particular sets of human resource management and employment practices including the direct effect on organisational performance and how this might affect overall economic growth.

Corporate Governance and Human Resources Management presents the many different dimensions to national corporate governance regimes, encompassing the legal, the political, the economic, and the social behavior. While there is much debate within the literature as to which is the most important aspect of each, this monograph provides a basis to evaluate this burgeoning literature.

 
ACG-010