Foundations and Trends® in Human–Computer Interaction > Vol 3 > Issue 3

Collaboration Research for Crisis Management Teams

Jill L. Drury, The MITRE Corporation, USA, jldrury@mitre.org Emily Beaton, The MITRE Corporation, USA, ebeaton@mitre.org Lindsley Boiney, The MITRE Corporation, USA, lboiney@mitre.org Michael O. Duncan, The MITRE Corporation, USA, mduncan@mitre.org Robin GreenPope, The MITRE Corporation, USA, rgreenpope@mitre.org Maurice D. Howland, The MITRE Corporation, USA, mhowland@mitre.org Gary L. Klein, The MITRE Corporation, USA, gklein@mitre.org
 
Suggested Citation
Jill L. Drury, Emily Beaton, Lindsley Boiney, Michael O. Duncan, Robin GreenPope, Maurice D. Howland and Gary L. Klein (2010), "Collaboration Research for Crisis Management Teams", Foundations and Trends® in Human–Computer Interaction: Vol. 3: No. 3, pp 139-212. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/1100000020

Published: 12 Mar 2010
© 2010 J. L. Drury, E. Beaton, L. Boiney, M. O. Duncan, R. GreenPope, M. D. Howland and G. L. Klein
 
Subjects
Computer Supported Cooperative Work
 

Free Preview:

Article Help

Share

Download article
In this article:
1 Introduction
2 Summary of Computer-Mediated Collaboration Theories
3 Collaboration Models
4 Making Sense of the Situation, the Team's Activities, and the Group's Decisions
5 Adopting Collaboration Technologies for Specific Tasks
6 Case Studies and New Ideas for Technology-Enabled Collaboration
7 Summary and Implications for Future Research
Acknowledgments
Authors' Biographies
References

Abstract

To aid research in crisis management, we reviewed the literature pertaining to synchronous, non-collocated, cross-organizational, time-sensitive collaboration. We examined the theoretical constructs that researchers have proposed for collaborative systems and determined that several of these, such as common ground and awareness theory, have particular applicability to crisis management. We reviewed collaboration models that were developed to provide frameworks for understanding the multiple facets of technological support to group work. Because teams normally need to come to a common understanding of the situation and the relevant decisions, we examined research in team awareness, sensemaking, and decision-making. Types of group tasks affect technology use and adoption, so we considered the literature surrounding these topics, as well, before turning to case studies of new collaboration technologies. We end with our assessment of the findings most relevant to developing new crisis management collaboration approaches, including procedures, needed functionality, and candidate capabilities.

DOI:10.1561/1100000020
ISBN: 978-1-60198-326-8
64 pp. $55.00
Buy book
 
ISBN: 978-1-60198-327-5
64 pp. $100.00
Buy E-book
Table of contents:
1: Introduction
2: Summary of computer-mediated collaboration theories
3: Collaboration Models
4: Making sense of the situation, the team's activities, and the group's decisions
5: Adopting collaboration technologies for specific tasks
6: Case studies and new ideas for technology-enabled collaboration
7: Summary and implications for future research
Acknowledgements
References

Collaboration Research for Crisis Management Teams

Collaboration Research for Crisis Management Teams reviews the literature pertaining to synchronous, non-collocated, cross-organizational, time-sensitive collaboration. It examines the theoretical constructs that researchers have proposed for collaborative systems and determines that several of these, such as common ground and awareness theory, have particular applicability to crisis management. It reviews collaboration models that were developed to provide frameworks for understanding the multiple facets of technological support to group work. Because teams normally need to come to a common understanding of the situation and the relevant decisions, it examines research in team awareness, sensemaking and decision-making. Types of group tasks affect technology use and adoption, so this text also considers the literature surrounding these topics, before turning to case studies of new collaboration technologies. It concludes with an assessment of the findings most relevant to developing new crisis management collaboration approaches, including procedures, needed functionality, and candidate capabilities. Collaboration Research for Crisis Management Teams is an excellent reference for anyone with a specific interest in large-scale crisis management or generally doing research in Human-Computer Interaction or Computer-Supported Cooperative Work.

 
HCI-020