International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics > Vol 1 > Issue 4

Sustainable Use of Renewable Resources: Implications of Spatial-Dynamic Ecological and Economic Processes

James N. Sanchirico, Department of Environmental Science and Policy, University of California, USA, jsanchirico@ucdavis.edu James E. Wilen, Department of Agriculture and Resource Economics, University of California, USA, wilen@primal.ucdavis.edu
 
Suggested Citation
James N. Sanchirico and James E. Wilen (2008), "Sustainable Use of Renewable Resources: Implications of Spatial-Dynamic Ecological and Economic Processes", International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics: Vol. 1: No. 4, pp 367-405. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/101.00000009

Published: 28 Feb 2008
© 2008 James N. Sanchirico and James E. Wilen
 
Subjects
Environmental Economics
 
Keywords
Q0Q2Q22R0Q57
BioeconomicsFisheriesMetapopulationSpatial ecologyOpen-accessSpatial policiesMarine reservesTerritorial Use Right Fisheries (TURFs)Individual fishing quotasZoningArea based managementMarine spatial planning
 

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In this article:
1 Introduction
2 Conventional Bioeconomic Analysis
3 Spatial Processes And Metapopulations
4 Bioeconomics with Metapopulation Models
5 Marine Reserves as Optimal Management
6 Institutions and Management in a Spatial Setting
References

Abstract

In this review we discuss the economic implications of spatial-dynamic processes operating at various scales in coupled human and natural systems where the coupling is through the harvest of a renewable resource. Before introducing the spatial aspects, we first summarize in Section 2 the economic conclusions of the seminal non-spatial bioeconomic research. In Section 3, we elaborate on some of the new findings about spatial patterns and processes in marine ecosystems with metapopulation models. These generalizations of the basic lumped parameter models include both larval and adult dispersal processes, and offer a parsimonious modeling approach for depicting spatially linked resources. Section 4 explores the bioeconomic implications of this new metapopulation paradigm under polar extreme institutional assumptions of open access and sole owner optimal use. We discuss in Section 5 the special issue of marine nature reserves or no-take zones. Section 6 discusses the institutional implications of the new spatial paradigm and the connections with similar investigations in other policy arenas.

DOI:10.1561/101.00000009