International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics > Vol 8 > Issue 3–4

Ecosystem Services Indicators: Improving the Linkage between Biophysical and Economic Analyses

James Boyd, Resources for the Future, USA, boyd@rff.org Paul Ringold, US Environmental Protection Agency, USA, Ringold.Paul@epa.gov Alan Krupnick, Resources for the Future, USA, krupnick@rff.org Robert J. Johnston, George Perkins Marsh Institute and Department of Economics, Clark University, USA, rjohnston@clarku.edu Matthew A. Weber, US Environmental Protection Agency, USA, weber.matthew@epa.gov Kim Hall, US Environmental Protection Agency and Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society, Oregon State University, USA, hall.kim@epa.gov
 
Suggested Citation
James Boyd, Paul Ringold, Alan Krupnick, Robert J. Johnston, Matthew A. Weber and Kim Hall (2016), "Ecosystem Services Indicators: Improving the Linkage between Biophysical and Economic Analyses", International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics: Vol. 8: No. 3–4, pp 359-443. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/101.00000073

Published: 06 Jun 2016
© 2016 J. Boyd, P. Ringold, A. Krupnick, R. J. Johnston, M. A. Weber and K. Hall
 
Subjects
Environmental Economics:
 
Keywords
Q51Q57
Ecosystem servicesEcological indicatorsNonmarket valuation
 

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In this article:
1. Introduction
2. Linking Indicators: Guiding Principles and Theory
3. The Usefulness of Linking Indicators in Various Types of Environmental Analysis
4. Linking Indicators: Key Topics and Literature Review
5. Conclusions and Recommendations
Acknowledgments
References

Abstract

For ecosystem services analysis, a key to collaboration between natural and social scientists is the identification and measurement of linking indicators: biophysical indicators that facilitate social evaluation, including monetary valuation of ecological changes. As ecosystem service analysts and practitioners better recognize the various ways in which people benefit from ecosystems, natural scientists will be called on to develop, use, and report on metrics and indicators that link to those diverse benefits. The paper develops principles to guide the identification of linking indicators; compares their features with those of more commonly collected ecological measures; and reviews empirical evidence pertinent to their identification, definition, and performance, primarily from the point of view of conducting monetary valuation of ecological outcomes.

DOI:10.1561/101.00000073