Foundations and Trends® in Technology, Information and Operations Management > Vol 6 > Issue 1

The U.S. Information Economy: Value, Employment, Industry Structure, and Trade

Uday Apte, Naval Postgraduate School, USA, umapte@nps.edu Uday Karmarkar, UCLA Anderson School of Management, University of California, USA, uday.karmarkar@anderson.ucla.edu Hiranya Nath, Sam Houston State University, USA, eco_hkn@shsu.edu
 
Suggested Citation
Uday Apte, Uday Karmarkar and Hiranya Nath (2012), "The U.S. Information Economy: Value, Employment, Industry Structure, and Trade", Foundations and Trends® in Technology, Information and Operations Management: Vol. 6: No. 1, pp 1-87. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/0200000013

Published: 20 Dec 2012
© 2012 U. Apte, U. Karmarkar and H. Nath
 
Subjects
Technology Management and Strategy,  Information Chain Structure and Competition,  Labor Economics
 
Keywords
Information economyServicesUS economyInformation intensive servicesInformation workersEmploymentIndustrializationServices tradeICT investment
 

Free Preview:

Article Help

Share

Download article
In this article:
1 Introduction
2 The Information Economy: Literature and History of Research
3 The U.S. Information Economy
4 Employment and Wages in the U.S. Economy
5 International Trade in Information-Intensive Services
6 Drivers of Economic Evolution and Sector Growth
7 The Consequences of Economic Evolution
8 Summary, Conclusions, and Future Research
References
A Online Technical Appendix

Abstract

This study examines the evolution of the United States (U.S.) economy after 1999, extending our previous studies [4, 8] up to 2007. The U.S. economy has moved steadily toward services and information-intensive sectors in terms of Gross National Product (GNP), employment, and wage distribution. Information-intensive services, the nexus of these two major trends, now compose the largest portion of the U.S. economy in terms of GNP value, jobs, and wages. In addition, we study the growth of international trade in services and information sectors, which is likely to become increasingly important in the future. Finally, we examine the factors underlying the shifts observable in the economy and the impact on competition, strategy, and sector structure.

DOI:10.1561/0200000013
ISBN: 978-1-60198-610-8
98 pp. $70.00
Buy book
 
ISBN: 978-1-60198-611-5
98 pp. $110.00
Buy E-book
Table of contents:
Introduction
The Information Economy: Literature and History of Research
The US Information Economy
Employment and Wages in the U.S. Economy
International Trade in Information Goods and Services
Drivers of Economic Evolution and Sector Growth
The Consequences of Economic Evolution
Summary, Conclusions, and Future Research
References

The U.S. Information Economy

The U.S. Information Economy: Value, Employment, Industry Structure, and Trade explores the confluence of two events – large economies in the world being dominated by services and a change from a material or physical economy to an information economy – by examining the double dichotomy of products versus services and information versus material, which divides the economy into four supersectors. This transformation to information and information-intensive services has a wide array of consequences. The authors examine some of these consequences to indicate the substantial implications for both management and policy decisions. After an introduction, the authors review research on the information economy in the U.S. and survey the literature on related topics. Sections 3 and 4 present the main results of the study, in terms of the two-way breakdown of the U.S. economy based on GNP data and labor statistics. Section 5 presents the changing patterns of international trade in information services. Section 6 discusses possible reasons for these trends, and the authors analyze the consequences of industrialization for information-intensive services in Section 7. The monograph concludes in Section 8 with a summary and a description of our ongoing research on these topics. Finally, a technical appendix is available on the book homepage that provides a description of the detailed calculations that were carried out to measure the size and structure of the U.S. information economy.

 
TOM-013

Online Technical Appendix | 0200000013_Online-Technical-Appendix-TOM-013.pdf (ZIP).

This is the article's accompanying technical appendix.

DOI: 10.1561/0200000013_app