Annals of Science and Technology Policy > Vol 2 > Issue 2

In Search of Evidence-based Science Policy: From the Endless Frontier to SciSIP

Albert H. Teich, Institute for International Science and Technology Policy, George Washington University, USA, ateich@gmail.com
 
Suggested Citation
Albert H. Teich (2018), "In Search of Evidence-based Science Policy: From the Endless Frontier to SciSIP", Annals of Science and Technology Policy: Vol. 2: No. 2, pp 75-199. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/110.00000007

Published: 19 Jun 2018
© 2018 Albert H. Teich
 
Subjects
History of the research community
 
Keywords
O30 InnovationO38 Government PolicyO32 Management of Technological Innovation and R&D
Evidence-basedInnovation policyScience policyR&DIndicatorsScience policy researchPolicy researchScience adviceTechnology policy
 

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In this article:
Glossary of Abbreviations and Acronyms
1. Introduction
2. Origins of Postwar Science Policy
3. Science Policy in the Post-Sputnik Era
4. Science Policy in Academia: Building a Community
5. Growth and Decline of Support for Science Policy Research in the Federal Government
6. Science Policymaking and Science Policy Research
7. Renaissance of Science Policy Research
8. Reflections
Acknowledgments
References
Author Biography

Abstract

The federal government invests billions of dollars every year in scientific research. How to allocate this money among fields, institutions, researchers, and projects; how to nurture the talent needed to conduct research at the frontiers of science; how to assess the results of research; and how to translate those results into useful products and services — answering these questions and others are the jobs of science and innovation policy.

In a 2005 speech, presidential science adviser John H. Marburger III suggested that the science policy community was not equipped with tools for such jobs and challenged it to “grow up, and quickly” so it could provide useful guides to action in our “global, technology-based society.” Growing up has meant becoming more empirical, evidence-based, and, in many instances, quantitative.

This paper tracks the evolution of U.S. science policy research largely as it has been conducted in universities and supported by the National Science Foundation, from its beginnings in the early 1960s to the present time, from reliance on expert opinion to more systematic, empirical studies. It examines how a community developed, the growth and decline of federal support, the emergence of the SciSIP (Science of Science and Innovation Policy) program and the ways in which that program has fostered new approaches to science policy. It concludes that the tools and data sets being created by program researchers can have significant impacts on policy, not just in science and technology, but in other fields as well.

DOI:10.1561/110.00000007
ISBN: 978-1-68083-444-4
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ISBN: 978-1-68083-445-1
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Table of contents:
Glossary of Abbreviations and Acronyms
1. Introduction
2. Origins of Postwar Science Policy
3. Science Policy in the Post-Sputnik Era
4. Science Policy in Academia: Building a Community
5. Growth and Decline of Support for Science Policy Research in the Federal Government
6. Science Policymaking and Science Policy Research
7. Renaissance of Science Policy Research
8. Reflections
Acknowledgments
References
Author Biography

In Search of Evidence-based Science Policy: From the Endless Frontier to SciSIP

In Search of Evidence-Based Science Policy: From the Endless Frontier to SciSIP tracks the evolution of U.S. science policy research largely as it has been conducted in universities and supported by the National Science Foundation, from its beginnings in the early 1960s to the present time, from reliance on expert opinion to more systematic, empirical studies. It examines how a community developed, the growth and decline of federal support, the emergence of the SciSIP (Science of Science and Innovation Policy) program and the ways in which that program has fostered new approaches to science policy. It concludes that the tools and data set created by program researchers can have significant impacts on policy, not just in science and technology, but in other fields as well.

 
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