Foundations and Trends® in Human–Computer Interaction > Vol 11 > Issue 3

HCI’s Making Agendas

Jeffrey Bardzell, Indiana University School of Informatics, Computing, and Engineering, USA, jbardzel@indiana.edu Shaowen Bardzell, Indiana University School of Informatics, Computing, and Engineering, USA, selu@indiana.edu Cindy Lin, University of Michigan, USA, cindylky@umich.edu Silvia Lindtner, University of Michigan, USA, lindtner@umich.edu Austin Toombs, Purdue University, USA, toombsa@purdue.edu
 
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Jeffrey Bardzell, Shaowen Bardzell, Cindy Lin, Silvia Lindtner and Austin Toombs (2017), "HCI’s Making Agendas", Foundations and Trends® in Human–Computer Interaction: Vol. 11: No. 3, pp 126-200. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/1100000066

Published: 20 Dec 2017
© 2017 J. Bardzell, S. Bardzell, C. Lin, S. Lindtner and A. Toombs
 
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In this article:
1. Introduction
2. Democracy and Tools: HCI’s Overarching Maker Agendas
3. Cultivating Making and Maker Identities
4. Critiquing Making and Critical Makers
5. Conclusion
References

Abstract

In this survey, we examine how making emerged as an interdisciplinary arena of scholarship, research and design that connects entrepreneurs, designers, researchers, critical theorists, historians, anthropologists, computer scientists and engineers. HCI is one among many other fields and domains that has declared having a stake in making. And yet, a lot of what and who defines making is happening outside the familiar research laboratory or design studio. We take this article as an opportunity to reflect on HCI’s relationship to making and how this relationship has changed over the last years. Making, we argue, presents HCI with the opportunity to question and revisit underlying principles and long-held aspirations and values of the field. Exactly because HCI and making share some fundamental ideals such as user empowerment and the democratization of participation and technology production, making confronts us with both the potential and the unintended consequences of our own work.

DOI:10.1561/1100000066
ISBN: 978-1-68083-372-0
86 pp. $65.00
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ISBN: 978-1-68083-373-7
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Table of contents:
1. Introduction
2. Democracy and Tools: HCI’s Overarching Maker Agendas
3. Cultivating Making and Maker Identities
4. Critiquing Making and Critical Makers
5. Conclusion
References

HCI’s Making Agendas

HCI’s Making Agendas examines how making has emerged as an interdisciplinary arena of scholarship, research and design that connects entrepreneurs, designers, researchers, critical theorists, historians, anthropologists, computer scientists and engineers. Human Computer Interaction (HCI) is one among many other fields and domains that has declared having a stake in making. And yet, a lot of what and who defines making is happening outside the familiar research laboratory or design studio. This monograph reflects on HCI’s relationship to making and how this relationship has changed over the last years. Making, it argues, presents HCI with the opportunity to question and revisit underlying principles and long-held aspirations and values of the field. Exactly because HCI and making share some fundamental ideals such as user empowerment and the democratization of participation and technology production, making confronts us with both the potential and the unintended consequences of our own work.

HCI’s Making Agendas is intended to bring readers into maker research and practice, to cultivate their appreciation for making’s many potentials while shining a critical light on cases of over-optimism and even delusion, and to empower you, the reader, to participate in this project of making.

 
HCI-066