Journal of Forest Economics > Vol 10 > Issue 1

Comparing the economic effects of fire on hiking demand in Montana and Colorado

Hayley Hesseln, , h.hesseln@usask.ca John B. Loomis, , Armando González-Cabán, ,
 
Suggested Citation
Hayley Hesseln, John B. Loomis and Armando González-Cabán (2004), "Comparing the economic effects of fire on hiking demand in Montana and Colorado", Journal of Forest Economics: Vol. 10: No. 1, pp 21-35. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfe.2004.03.002

Published: 28 May 2004
© 0 2004 Hayley Hesseln, John B. Loomis, Armando González-Cabán
 
Subjects
 
Keywords
JEL Codes:Q 260
Recreation demandTravel cost methodWildfirePrescribed fireNational Fire Plan
 

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In this article:
Introduction
Methodology
Fire effects TCM
Data collection
Econometric model construction
Survey results
Conclusion

Abstract

We conducted surveys on 33 trails within National Forests in Colorado and Montana to test whether forest fires affected recreation demand. Data were collected on actual and intended number of visits. A count data travel cost demand model was estimated by pooling actual and intended visitation responses in both states. Results indicate that Montana hikers take more trips yet have lower net benefits ($12/trip) than do Colorado visitors ($55/trip). The annual value of trips taken decreases in both states as areas recover from crown fires providing support for the National Fire Plan in terms of fire prevention and suppression.

DOI:10.1016/j.jfe.2004.03.002