Journal of Forest Economics > Vol 15 > Issue 4

Effect of conserving habitat for biodiversity on optimal management of non-industrial private forests in Florida

Jagannadha R. Matta, , Janaki R.R. Alavalapati, , janaki@ufl.edu George A. Stainback, ,
 
Suggested Citation
Jagannadha R. Matta, Janaki R.R. Alavalapati and George A. Stainback (2009), "Effect of conserving habitat for biodiversity on optimal management of non-industrial private forests in Florida", Journal of Forest Economics: Vol. 15: No. 4, pp 223-235. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfe.2008.08.001

Published: 0/12/2009
© 0 2009 Jagannadha R. Matta, Janaki R.R. Alavalapati, George A. Stainback
 
Subjects
 
Keywords
JEL Codes:Q23
Biodiversity conservationSustainable forestryProfitabilityLand expectation value
 

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In this article:
Introduction
NIPF and forest practices for biodiversity conservation in Florida
Model specification
Results and discussion
Conclusions

Abstract

Healthy forests and enhanced habitat for wildlife is a growing concern among public and policy makers. These concerns have led to substantial interest in promoting various regulatory and voluntary compliance policies to further biodiversity on private forests. These policies, however, might result in additional cost to forestland owners. In this paper, we estimate the opportunity cost of adopting various biodiversity-friendly forest practices. We do this in the context of slash pine, a dominant commercial tree plantation species in Florida. Results suggest that prescribed burning, invasive species control, maintaining streamside buffer zones, and extending timber harvest beyond the optimal rotation age would significantly decrease the profitability of slash pine forestry. If the major objective of landowners is to maximize profits, results indicate that they are less likely to adopt these practices at socially desirable levels without a policy support. More specifically, results suggest that an annual payment of $38–83 per hectare is required for landowners to adopt these practices. The paper further argues that application of mere command-and-control approaches to implement these practices may result in conversion of private forests to other competitive land uses.

DOI:10.1016/j.jfe.2008.08.001