Journal of Forest Economics > Vol 18 > Issue 1

Valuing mortality impacts of smoke exposure from major southern California wildfires

Ikuho Kochi, , Patricia A. Champ, , pchamp@fs.fed.us John B. Loomis, , Geoffrey H. Donovan, ,
 
Suggested Citation
Ikuho Kochi, Patricia A. Champ, John B. Loomis and Geoffrey H. Donovan (2012), "Valuing mortality impacts of smoke exposure from major southern California wildfires", Journal of Forest Economics: Vol. 18: No. 1, pp 61-75. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfe.2011.10.002

Published: 0/1/2012
© 0 2012 Ikuho Kochi, Patricia A. Champ, John B. Loomis, Geoffrey H. Donovan
 
Subjects
 
Keywords
JEL Codes:I180Q510Q530
2003 southern California wildfiresMortality impactSocial costAir pollutionValue of statistical life
 

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In this article:
Introduction
Quantifying the mortality impact
Mortality impact analysis results
Conclusions and policy implications

Abstract

While the mortality impacts of urban air pollution have been well addressed in the literature, very little is known about the mortality impacts and associated social cost from wildfire-smoke exposure (Kochi et al., 2010; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2004). In an attempt to address this knowledge gap, we estimate the social cost associated with excess mortality due to smoke exposure during the 2003 southern California wildfires. Accounting for confounding factors such as seasonality and fluctuation of daily mortality levels, we identify 133 excess cardiorespiratory-related deaths caused by wildfire-smoke exposure. The mean estimated total mortality-related cost associated with the 2003 southern California wildfire event is approximately one billion U.S. dollars. Accounting for mortality costs associated with wildfire-smoke exposure allows for a better understanding of the tradeoffs associated with fuel treatment programs and suppression costs.

DOI:10.1016/j.jfe.2011.10.002