Journal of Forest Economics > Vol 20 > Issue 3

Adapting the optimal selective-logging of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) stands in NE Spain to increasing CO2 concentrations

Ruben Javier Mur, Department of Economics, University of Girona, Spain, Renan-Ulrich Goetz, Department of Economics, University of Girona, Spain, Angels Xabadia, Department of Economics, University of Girona, Spain, angels.xabadia@udg.edu Francesc Córdoba, Fractalia Environmental Consulting, Spain, Carles Gracia, Center for Ecological Research and Forestry Applications (CREAF) and University of Barcelona, Spain,
 
Suggested Citation
Ruben Javier Mur, Renan-Ulrich Goetz, Angels Xabadia, Francesc Córdoba and Carles Gracia (2014), "Adapting the optimal selective-logging of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) stands in NE Spain to increasing CO2 concentrations", Journal of Forest Economics: Vol. 20: No. 3, pp 286-304. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfe.2014.09.001

Published: 0/8/2014
© 0 2014 Ruben Javier Mur, Renan-Ulrich Goetz, Angels Xabadia, Francesc Córdoba, Carles Gracia
 
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Keywords
JEL Codes:Q23Q54C61
Climate changeForest managementSize-distributed standDynamic optimization
 

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In this article:
Introduction
Materials and methods
Results
Discussion
Funding

Abstract

Predicted increases in CO2 concentrations will affect forest ecosystems. In particular, they will impact tree growth, which in turn affects reproduction and mortality and consequently, forest planning. This study integrates different climate change scenarios of future biogeochemical processes and an economic model into a forest management model to determine the optimal selective-logging regime of Scots pine stands. It analyzes the economic implications of the management changes in comparison with the business as usual strategy. Adaption to new climatic conditions shows that it is optimal to increase the number of standing trees and to reduce the age of the logged trees. The results suggest that the failure to adapt the management regime has clear implications on the profitability of forests. Moreover, they show that higher mortality is likely to have a significant impact on the optimal forest management regime.

DOI:10.1016/j.jfe.2014.09.001