Journal of Forest Economics > Vol 21 > Issue 2

Suitability of discrete choice experiments for landscape management under the European Landscape Convention

Amaia de Ayala, Basque Centre for Climate Change (BC3), Spain, amaia.deayala@bc3research.org David Hoyos, Department of Applied Economics III (Econometrics and Statistics), University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Spain, david.hoyos@ehu.es Petr Mariel, Department of Applied Economics III (Econometrics and Statistics), University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Spain, petr.mariel@ehu.es
 
Suggested Citation
Amaia de Ayala, David Hoyos and Petr Mariel (2015), "Suitability of discrete choice experiments for landscape management under the European Landscape Convention", Journal of Forest Economics: Vol. 21: No. 2, pp 79-96. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfe.2015.01.002

Published: 0/4/2015
© 0 2015 Amaia de Ayala, David Hoyos, Petr Mariel
 
Subjects
 
Keywords
JEL Codes:C51Q24Q51Q58
European Landscape ConventionDiscrete Choice ExperimentLlanada AlavesaRandom Parameter LogitWillingness to payWelfare measure
 

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In this article:
Introduction
Case study description
The Discrete Choice Experiment for landscape valuation
Results
Discussion and conclusions

Abstract

Landscapes throughout the world are increasingly being altered as a result of human actions and natural processes, therefore necessitating urgent management. Acknowledging this situation, the European Landscape Convention (ELC) was approved in 2000 with the explicit objective of protecting, managing and planning European landscapes. In this paper, we provide empirical evidence on the suitability of the Discrete Choice Experiment (DCE) methodology for valuing multidimensional landscapes under the ELC. An application in the Basque Country, Spain, serves as an example to illustrate that the DCE methodology may be suitable for supporting the aims of the ELC because: (i) it is a tool for public consultation; (ii) it offers an insight into the relative attractiveness of key landscape attributes, such as native forests and farming activities; and (iii) it provides policy-makers with quantitative information on the public preferences for potential future landscape protection, management and planning programmes. The results highlight the important role that the conservation of native forests and the promotion of organic farming may play in the management of European landscapes, which in turn is found to be strongly culturally dependent.

DOI:10.1016/j.jfe.2015.01.002