Journal of Forest Economics > Vol 32 > Issue 1

Optimizing the joint production of timber and marketed mushrooms in Picea abies stands in eastern Finland

Veera Tahvanainen, , veera.tahvanainen@uef.fi Jari Miina, Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Finland, Timo Pukkala, , Mikko Kurttila, Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Finland,
 
Suggested Citation
Veera Tahvanainen, Jari Miina, Timo Pukkala and Mikko Kurttila (2018), "Optimizing the joint production of timber and marketed mushrooms in Picea abies stands in eastern Finland", Journal of Forest Economics: Vol. 32: No. 1, pp 34-41. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jfe.2018.04.002

Published: 0/8/2018
© 0 2018 Veera Tahvanainen, Jari Miina, Timo Pukkala, Mikko Kurttila
 
Subjects
 
Keywords
JEL Codes:Q23
Multiple use forestryNon-Wood forest productsBoletus edulisLactarius trivialisLactarius torminosusLactarius rufus
 

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In this article:
Introduction
Materials and methods
Results
Discussion
Conclusions

Abstract

There is a notable potential for utilizing marketed mushrooms in Finnish forests. The most marketed mushrooms in Finland are Boletus edulis and Lactarius spp. To improve preconditions for the use of this potential the stand management was optimized separately for joint production of (1) timber and B. edulis, (2) timber and Lactarius spp. and (3) timber and both B. edulis and Lactarius spp. in even-aged Picea abies stands in eastern Finland. In optimizations soil expectation value (SEV) with a 3% discount rate was maximized and picking costs and mushroom prices were included in calculations. The optimal two-thinning management schedule for timber only consisted of a rotation length of 96 years and heavy thinnings from above. The optimal stand management schedules for joint production were very similar to that of timber, because mushroom yields are at their highest just before the first commercial thinning. When management was optimized for mushroom production only, the optimal rotation lengths were shorter, and for B. edulis the thinnings were lighter. Management optimal for Lactarius spp. did not include thinning treatments. The production of timber and marketed mushrooms were mostly in synergy, mushroom harvesting creating significant additional income to forest owners.

DOI:10.1016/j.jfe.2018.04.002