APSIPA Transactions on Signal and Information Processing > Vol 11 > Issue 1

Psycho-linguistic Differences among Competing Vaccination Communities on Social Media

Jialiang Shi, Graduate School of Informatics, Nagoya University, Japan, Piyush Ghasiya, School of Environment and Society, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan, Kazutoshi Sasahara, School of Environment and Society, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan, sasahara.k.aa@m.titech.ac.jp
 
Suggested Citation
Jialiang Shi, Piyush Ghasiya and Kazutoshi Sasahara (2022), "Psycho-linguistic Differences among Competing Vaccination Communities on Social Media", APSIPA Transactions on Signal and Information Processing: Vol. 11: No. 1, e15. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/116.00000056

Publication Date: 25 May 2022
© 2022 J. Shi, P. Ghasiya and K. Sasahara
 
Subjects
 
Keywords
Anti-vaccine movementCOVID-19psycho-linguistic featuresmoralitysocial mediatext mining
 

Share

Open Access

This is published under the terms of CC BY-NC.

Downloaded: 279 times

In this article:
Introduction 
Related Work 
Data and Methods 
Results 
Discussion 
Limitations and Future Work 
Conclusion 
References 

Abstract

Currently, the significance of social media in disseminating noteworthy information on topics such as health, politics, and the economy is indisputable. During the COVID-19 pandemic, anti-vaxxers have used social media to distribute fake news and anxiety-provoking information about the vaccine. Such social media practice may harm the public. Here, we characterise the psycho-linguistic features of anti-vaxxers on the online social network Twitter. For this, we collected COVID-19 related tweets from February 2020 to June 2021 to analyse vaccination stance, linguistic features, and social network characteristics. Our results demonstrated that, compared to pro-vaxxers, anti-vaxxers tend to have more negative emotions, narrative thinking, and immoral tendencies. Furthermore, we found a tighter network structure in anti-vaxxers even after mass vaccination. This study can advance our understanding of the online anti-vaccination movement, and become critical for social media management and policy action during and after the pandemic.

DOI:10.1561/116.00000056