APSIPA Transactions on Signal and Information Processing > Vol 12 > Issue 1

Virtual Microphone Technique for Binauralization for Multiple Sound Images on 2–Channel Stereo Signals Detected by Microphones Mounted Closely

R. Jinzai, University of Tsukuba, Japan, K. Yamaoka, University of Tsukuba and Tokyo Metropolitan University, Japan, S. Makino, University of Tsukuba and Waseda University, Japan, N. Ono, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Japan, T. Yamada, University of Tsukuba, Japan, M. Matsumoto, University of Tsukuba, Japan, matsumotojazz814@gmail.com
 
Suggested Citation
R. Jinzai, K. Yamaoka, S. Makino, N. Ono, T. Yamada and M. Matsumoto (2023), "Virtual Microphone Technique for Binauralization for Multiple Sound Images on 2–Channel Stereo Signals Detected by Microphones Mounted Closely", APSIPA Transactions on Signal and Information Processing: Vol. 12: No. 1, e32. http://dx.doi.org/10.1561/116.00000079

Publication Date: 11 Jul 2023
© 2023 R. Jinzai, K. Yamaoka, S. Makino, N. Ono and T. Yamada and M. Matsumoto
 
Subjects
 
Keywords
Virtual microphoneextrapolationbinaural signal2–ch stereo signalsarray signal processing
 

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In this article:
Introduction 
Virtual Microphone, VM, Technique 
Objective Evaluation 
Subjective Evaluation 
Conclusion 
References 

Abstract

Because inter–channel time differences (ICTDs) between signals detected by real microphones mounted close to each other are much smaller than inter–aural time differences (ITDs) for sound image localization, sound images are localized at azimuths different from those of sound sources. In this paper, we propose a virtual microphone technique, which simulates binaural signals by equalizing ICTDs to ITDs, to localize sound images at azimuths of the sound sources with reference to the real microphones. Binaural signals simulated by the proposed method were examined objectively and subjectively by tests on two-sound-image localization. The tests revealed that the two sound images were localized at azimuths of the sound sources with reference to the real microphones.

DOI:10.1561/116.00000079